"Intend, Know, Conceive and Believe, and you will Receive!" Let’s put this to the test and write out our Action Lists for 2011. The purpose of our group is to encourage each other and make it happen, so why do it alone when we can do it together - positive energy is very invigorating!! So come let’s get this year started on the right note…
Make 2011 the year to eliminate that awful word, ‘procrastination’ and replace it with, ‘proactivation’. The reason we all connect to groups such as ours is to build a support network. So let’s take advantage of this and encourage each other by actively setting our goals and writing up a wish list together for the coming year. Watch what happens when you actually voice your plans and wishes and write it down… we will be monitoring our own progress throughout the year … all part of the master plan to achieve success - whatever that may be for each of us…

"Intend, Know, Conceive and Believe, and you will Receive!" Let’s put this to the test and write out our Action Lists for 2011. The purpose of our group is to encourage each other and make it happen, so why do it alone when we can do it together - positive energy is very invigorating!! So come let’s get this year started on the right note…

Make 2011 the year to eliminate that awful word, ‘procrastination’ and replace it with, ‘proactivation’. The reason we all connect to groups such as ours is to build a support network. So let’s take advantage of this and encourage each other by actively setting our goals and writing up a wish list together for the coming year. Watch what happens when you actually voice your plans and wishes and write it down… we will be monitoring our own progress throughout the year … all part of the master plan to achieve success - whatever that may be for each of us…

Abundance exists - it’s everywhere; the only difference is you …
Why is Networking still a Dirty Word?

Aussies need networking lessons

Kate Southam, Editor

An executive trainer claims Australian companies are wasting huge amounts of money because their people do not know how to “network”.

Julia Palmer set up B Consulted over three years ago and has trained top level executives and sales professionals from all over Australia.

She says networking remains a lost opportunity in Australia with Sydney business people the worst when it comes to effective networking techniques.

“Networking is still a dirty word here in Australia as people associate it with selling,” says Ms Palmer. “It’s not about selling but about building relationships.”

““Companies are spending a lot of money on events but if your people are in a room and they don’t know how to communicate, then it is just a huge waste of money.

“Sydney people are probably the worst. They tend to be rude, transactional and judgemental and most likely to start a conversation with the question: ‘what do you do?’

Ms Palmer says networking is about building relationships with people with common or complimentary interests to yours with a view that one day; down the road you might be able to assist one another.

“It is too late to build a relationship when you need it most,” says Ms Palmer.

Gary Daly agrees. As the general manager of sales for the event venue arm of Luna Park in Sydney, he is an expert on corporate events and working the room. Yet he still sent over a dozen employees to B Consulted for training.

“I think the whole issue of networking and the training of it is long over due in this country,” says Mr Daly.

“The most gratifying thing about sending my team on Julia’s course was hearing them say after, ‘I thought I knew what it was all about but now I realise I didn’t’,” he says.

“Networking is often misconstrued as ‘I have to go in sell my product and get as many business cards as I can and leave’. What it is about is using an introduction to be in the very early process of building a relationship.

“A by product of that relationship is getting business. Networking should be about getting to understand the person with whom you are speaking - not just thrusting your product in front of people.

“It is not always about the dollars. Often we get calls from people we met at events seeking our advice and that shows they are comfortable with us. A by product might be revenue down the line.

“Companies today spend an extraordinary amount of money being members of organisations and associations.

“A lot of those memberships are to stimulate business but amazingly networking in Australia is still about a half a dozen people from the one organisation going to a function, standing together having a few drinks and then grabbing a handful of business cards on their way out,” Mr Daly said.

Tips on effective networking

  • Ms Palmer advises doing some research before accepting an invitation to an event to establish if you really should attend at all.
  • If you are attending a function with work colleagues, split up and meet some new people.
  • Look for groups of three or more to break into. A pair of people in deep conversation is probably not the place to start.
  • Do not peer at someone’s breast trying to read their name tag. Instead, extend a hand, introduce yourself and the other person will respond in kind.
  • If see a group, be upfront and ask, “may I join you?” Smile, introduce yourself and then take a listening role.
  • When walking up to someone on their own, introduce yourself and then make some small talk. Don’t let your first question be: “What do you do?”
  • When your employer is hosting a function, no matter what your role, make a point of walking up to people on their own to make them feel comfortable.
  • If you are asked for your business card by all means offer it but otherwise wait until you establish if you would like to stay in touch with the person you have just met. Same applies to asking for business cards. Oh, but do make sure you have plenty on hand.
  • Having a drink is fine but don’t over do it. Ms Palmer says her research shows people feel more comfortable approaching someone with a drink in their hand.

Article from CareerOne.com.au
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RichLifeAcademy

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Fun and Games Night!

Come on down to the Hotel CBD, Varsity Lakes for a Fun night of games, good times and good friendships to be formed!  

Hotel CBD, Varsity Parade, Varsity Lakes, Gold Coast, Qld.  21/9/10 @ 6.30pm

(You’ll love it…Check it Out!)

Do You Sincerely Want To Be Rich?

Success Key"By ‘rich’ I mean in excess of ten million pounds. These days you are not rich if you have one million.

Although not pocket-change, a million in the bank would merely allow you to live in moderate comfort for the rest of your days. You would have to be careful with money. You could not be extravagant. One million in disposable capital would give you around £50,000 a year in salary after tax, which is a lot less than a good company director gets. If you took this salary, the million would slowly be eaten away by inflation until it was worth just £350,000 (today’s buying power) in about fifteen years. Hardly a king’s ransom, I think you’ll agree.

One million pounds buys you a decent house in the South of England, that’s all. After you’ve bought the house, all the money has gone and there would not be a penny left to furnish it, pay the bills or for living expenses. No, the days are long gone when becoming a millionaire was a crazy dream. Being a millionaire is not what it used to be. A millionaire in 1900 would have the equivalent of one hundred million pounds in today’s money! Ten million though….ah, now we’re talking sensible money.

Ten million today is worth the same as one million used to be worth in the 1950’s. A millionaire really was someone before 1950.

With ten million in the bank you can spend about £250,000 a year (£20,000 a month) and still have modest growth on your capital, but you would be in the bottom echelons of the wealthy, knocking for admittance to the fringes of their outer circle. Interestingly, if your ten million was ever reduced to one million, you would be described as ‘flat broke’ by your new circle of friends. People would talk about you in hushed and sympathetic voices. They would turn away and cough politely as you walked into a room. This would not be snobbery; just embarrassment and pity for one reduced to such poverty.

“He’s down to his last million! Oh the poor, poor dear boy!”

The point here is perspective.”

~Excerpt from, “The Inner Circle 7 Secrets to Wealth and Abundance,”  by  Stuart Goldsmith.